News

For all the latest from EMOHA go to the EMOHA blog.

Keep recording and carry on

We are delighted to report that oral history training still continues during the covid-19 pandemic, albeit online. There are drawbacks to working remotely: a Zoom call doesn't capture the dynamic of the face-to-face interview; body language, eye-contact in particular, are affected. The quality of an online call between people in different physical spaces is never going to be of the highest quality. Despite this, many projects in the East Midlands have found ways to continue with their oral history plans online, maintaining a momentum and keeping volunteers engaged at a time when social isolation is causing major impacts on the wellbeing of us all. Recording oral histories at this time also provides a snapshot of how we can work during the most difficult of conditions and an insight into how the pandemic has affected us. Read more in our December Update on the EMOHA blog.

Latest guidance on oral history during the Covid pandemic

The Oral History Society have updated their advice on oral history interviewing during the covid-19 pandemic. The guide was written in the context of the pandemic which required the suspension of all face-to-face oral history interviewing. In response to increased interest in conducting remote interviews their guidance looks at the ethical, legal, methodological and technical issues that need to be considered before deciding whether or not to conduct a remote interview. You can read more on the Oral History Society's website.

The Silent Archive: Oral Testimonies of Menopause

January 2020

EMOHA has been awarded a grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund to develop a project to gather oral testimonies around the theme of menopause. Read more about the Silent Archive project on the EMOHA blog.