Quality and Safety in Healthcare

CPD, 6 or 12 days

This is for you if... you have experience of working in healthcare and want to improve your knowledge of the theory and practice of improving quality and safety within the sector.

Course Description

These short courses cover both theoretical and practical aspects of healthcare quality and patient safety. The teaching will draw on the internationally renowned research of the SAPPHIRE (Social Science APPlied to Healthcare Improvement REsearch) and TIMMS (The Infant Mortality & Morbidity Studies) research groups as well as other experts at the University of Leicester.

These courses offer a sound grounding in research methods, practice and theory in the field of healthcare quality and patient safety as well as developing key transferable skills in critical appraisal, academic writing, project management and communication.

Each of these short courses is also a module within the MSc in Quality and Safety in Healthcare.

Key Facts
Department
Health Sciences
Contact

mscqsh@leicester.ac.uk

Department of Health Sciences website


Why Leicester?

Leicester is prominent in the field of quality and safety in healthcare. Our teaching draws on the internationally renowned research of the SAPPHIRE (Social Science APPlied to Healthcare Improvement REsearch) and TIMMS (The Infant Mortality & Morbidity Studies) research groups as well as other experts at the University of Leicester.

The Department of Health Sciences hosts the Leicestershire Improvement, Innovation and Patient Safety (LIIPS) Unit – a unique collaborative endeavour between healthcare and academia that focuses on facilitating improvement in the quality and safety of healthcare.

To allow you to study flexibly while working, the modules on the Quality and Safety in Healthcare degree are offered as standalone CPD modules, with the opportunity to build into a PGCert, PGDip or MSc.

Course Structure

Quality and Quality Improvement in Healthcare

Quality and Quality Improvement in Healthcare

This course will introduce major approaches to quality in healthcare and encourage constructive critical thinking about methods for improvement that have been adapted from industry and from other non-healthcare sectors.

Dates

There are 12 days of on-campus teaching on this course in 2017:

27/28 September; 11/12 October; 26 October; 8/9 November; 22/23 November; 6/7 December; 13 December

Topics covered

  • History of quality and safety in healthcare
  • Challenges in conceptualising and defining quality
  • Major policy approaches to quality in healthcare, including regulation, large-scale data collection, public reporting, clinical guidelines and institutional arrangements
  • Rationale for undertaking quality improvement (QI) in healthcare
  • Leading approaches to QI and their applicability to different contexts
  • Role of programme theories and logic models in QI efforts
  • Role of PDSA cycles in QI efforts
  • Methods for evaluating QI efforts
  • Theories of dissemination and implementation of improvement interventions

Assessment

  • Group presentation (20%)
  • Written report, 1,500 words (30%)
  • Case study, 2,000 words (50%)


Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Patient Safety

Patient Safety

This course will explore influences on patient safety and how improvements can be secured in healthcare environments, including both hospital and community-based care.

Dates

There are 6 days of on-campus teaching on this course in 2017:

4/5 October; 18/19 October; 1/2 November

Topics covered

  • Background to patient safety movement in healthcare, including policy contexts
  • Approaches to measuring and monitoring safety in health systems and health services
  • Constructs and theories underlying the study of patient safety from different perspectives
  • What healthcare can learn from high reliability industries
  • Safety problems in priority areas
  • Evaluation of evidence relevant to improving safety
  • Challenges in improving patient safety, including intervention design, evaluation and implementation.
  • How social science methods can improve understanding of whether and how efforts targeting patient safety succeed

Assessment

  • Oral and visual presentation (30%)
  • Essay, 2,500 words (70%)

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Human Factors and Ergonomics for Patient Safety

Human Factors and Ergonomics for Patient Safety

This course will explore how the application of relevant methods and knowledge in the discipline of ergonomics and human factors is critical to patient safety and improvement in the healthcare field.

Dates

There are 6 days of on-campus teaching on this course in 2018:

7/8 March; 25/26 April; 9/10 May

Topics covered

  • Human factors and ergonomics in healthcare: how they relate to quality improvement
  • Interdependency of human factors to one another and to patient safety
  • Theoretical knowledge of human factors in the healthcare environment
  • Practical application of human factors knowledge to the patient environment
  • Tools which can provide a human factors solution to a practical problem, including medication, medical equipment, patient services and systems
  • Healthcare environment and design solutions based on an appropriate empirically based approach

Assessment

  • Group presentation (25%)
  • Essay, 3,000 words (75%)

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Measuring and Monitoring in Healthcare

Measuring and Monitoring in Healthcare

This course will investigate the methodologies used in the measurement, reporting and interpretation of clinical quality and safety indicators.

Dates

There are 6 days of on-campus teaching on this course in 2018:

17/18 January; 7/8 February; 21/22 March

Topics covered

  • Role of the monitoring of clinical indicators in the process of quality improvement
  • Desirable characteristics of a quality indicator in healthcare
  • Basic methodologies for reporting quality indicators: longitudinal and cross-sectional data
  • Measurement plans for QI projects
  • Operational definitions for quality measures
  • Data collection systems
  • Principles of statistical process control in the context of quality improvement efforts.
  • Challenges in comparing data from different organisations or populations
  • Criteria used in identifying ‘signals’ in control charts.

Assessment

  • Written report on formative group task, 1,500 words (20%)
  • Report on an example of measuring a quality indicator, 2,000 words (80%)

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Leading, Managing and Organising Quality and Safety in Healthcare

Leading, Managing and Organising Quality and Safety in Healthcare

This course will look at issues of professional and managerial practice in healthcare, with a particular focus on quality and safety. It will look at effective management, leadership and partnership working across professional and organisational groups. 

Dates

There are 6 days of on-campus teaching on this course in 2018:

23/24 May; 6/7 June; 20/21 June

Topics covered

  • Theories of leadership, change management, governance and organisation, with particular reference to healthcare
  • Characteristics of healthcare organisation; implications of these for leadership, management and team work
  • Key strategies for leadership and change management: negotiating, managing conflict, coaching, approaches to service transformation and addressing behaviours that undermine safety culture
  • Impact of national policy on quality and safety in healthcare; implications of this for management, leadership and clinical practice
  • Strategies for leading and engaging others in improving quality and safety in healthcare
  • Real world case studies of leading and managing change/improvement
  • Key challenges and dilemmas of leading and managing in the current healthcare context (including the structural context)

Assessment

  • Group-based presentation (10%)
  • Written report on case study, 1,500 words (30%)
  • Essay, 2,000 words (60%)

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Teaching and Assessment

Each course consists of several days of on-campus teaching in the form of lectures, seminars, group work, directed reading and case study analysis.

The course in 'Quality and Quality Improvement in Healthcare' runs for 12 days; each of the others runs for six days.

Assessment includes written reports, group presentations and essays.

Courses can be taken as attendance only.


Entry Requirements

Please confirm in your application that your experience and your professional development aims are both appropriate to the course(s) you are applying for.


English Language Requirements

IELTS 7.0 (or equivalent) with a minimum score of 6.5 in each element. If your first language is not English, you may need to provide evidence of your English language ability. If you do not yet meet our requirements, our English Language Teaching Unit (ELTU) offers a range of courses to help you to improve your English to the necessary standard.


Fees and Funding

  • 30-credit course

    This course is worth 30 credits and costs £1,700

    • Quality and Quality Improvement in Healthcare

    A limited number of bursaries are now available for this course, offering 50% off the standard module fee of £1,700. To be considered, just state on your application that you are applying for the bursary. The deadline is 5.00pm on Wednesday 13 September 2017.

    15-credit courses

    Each of these courses is worth 15 credits and costs £850

    • Patient Safety
    • Human Factors and Ergonomics for Patient Safety
    • Measuring and Monitoring in Healthcare
    • Leading, Managing and Organising Quality and Safety in Healthcare
  • To be confirmed.

Career Opportunities

These courses are designed to help you in your existing work where that involves ensuring and promoting quality and safety in healthcare. They can also contribute to your career development by offering skills that are in acknowledged shortage in the health service, and which align with nationally recognised NHS criteria for promotion and job profiling.


Careers

Whether you're an employee looking to get ahead or an employer keen to develop the capabilities of your workforce, studying a short course with us will bring the resources of a leading University to your organisation.


Course Qualification Start Dates Availability
Quality and Quality Improvement in Healthcare CPD September each year

Not currently available; contact admissions.

Patient Safety CPD October each year

Not currently available; contact admissions.

Human Factors and Ergonomics for Patient Safety CPD Apply Now
Measuring and Monitoring in Healthcare CPD Apply Now
Leading, Managing and Organising Quality and Safety in Healthcare CPD Apply Now
Course
Quality and Quality Improvement in Healthcare
Qualification
CPD
Start Dates
September each year
Availability

Not currently available; contact admissions.

Course
Patient Safety
Qualification
CPD
Start Dates
October each year
Availability

Not currently available; contact admissions.

Course
Human Factors and Ergonomics for Patient Safety
Qualification
CPD
Start Dates
Availability
Course
Measuring and Monitoring in Healthcare
Qualification
CPD
Start Dates
Availability
Course
Leading, Managing and Organising Quality and Safety in Healthcare
Qualification
CPD
Start Dates
Availability