People

Dr Asako Ohinata

Lecturer in Economics

School/Department: Business School of

Telephone: +44 (0)116 252 2894

Email: ao160@leicester.ac.uk

Profile

I am an applied microeconomist conducting research on the topics of education and ageing. In the past I have analysed questions on immigrant children. More specifically I have studied their educational attainment as well as their potential influence on the native students who are studying in the same classroom. I am currently working to see how governmental financial support affects people's savings and caregiving behaviours

Research

I am an applied microeconomist conducting research on the topics of education and ageing. In the past I have analysed questions on immigrant children. More specifically I have studied their educational attainment as well as their potential influence on the native students who are studying in the same classroom. I am currently working to see how governmental financial support affects people's savings and caregiving behaviours.

Publications

(0)

Young immigrant children and their educational attainment Economic Letters 2012 3 288-290 (with J.C. van Ours)

How immigrant children affect the academic achievement of native Dutch children? Economic Journal 2013 123 F308-F331 (with J.C. van Ours)

Quantile peer effects of immigrant children at primary schools Labour 2016 30 135-157 (with J.C. van Ours)

The educational consequences of language proficiency for young children Economics of Education Review 2016 54 1-15 (with Yuxin Yao and J.C. van Ours)

Financial support for long-term elderly care and household saving behaviour Oxford Economic Papers 2020 72: 247-268 (Asako Ohinata Matteo Picchio)

Demographic transition and fertility rebound in economic development The Scandinavian Journal of Economics forthcoming (with Dimitrios Varvarigos)

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Supervision

Economics of health economics of education

Teaching

EC1005 Maths for Economics I. EC3082 Economics of Health

Press and media

Government financial support for long-term care and behavioural responses
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