Dr David Wilkin

Honorary Fellow 

Email: drw25@le.ac.uk

Twitter: @DavidRWilkin

David graduated with a BA in Criminology and Psychology and a BSc in Sociology and Human Geography, both from the Open University. Following these David successfully undertook both an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice and a PhD at the University of Leicester; the latter focusing on hate crimes on disabled people occurring on UK public transport. David had spent over thirty years in various roles within the public transport sector; from being a train driver to incident manager and latterly in senior management roles which included capital project work and work to improve the security of railways generally. Entering the training sector, David then led a small group of Equality and Inclusion Trainers - their role being to bring an understanding of diversity to largely sceptical workforces. 

David is also Lead Coordinator of the Disability Hate Crime Network

Research and Impact

David’s passion is to make life better for people who have suffered as victims of hate crimes, specialising in people who have been victimised because of their disability. David’s approaches have included researching previously untold experiences of Disability Hate Crime and exploring the effectivity of safeguarding. Other research interests include the associated topics of vulnerability and also emotionality during research. 

David gives both public presentations and delivers academic lectures and papers concerning hate crime. David has acted as an advisor to government departments, public authorities, Disabled and Deaf People’s Organisations and to private companies. His drive is to raise awareness of Disability Hate Crime and to help deliver cost-effective legislative compliance in safeguarding disabled people. 

Blog Posts

Your Problem is My Problem: Disability Hate Crime By Proxy

How Lucky Am I: Victim, to Researcher, back to Victim

Hate Crime and Mental Health: Repairing the harms of hate

Publications

Wilkin, D. Disability Hate Crime: Experiences of Everyday Hostility on Public Transport