Pandemic Sexual and Gendered Citizenships

 

Overview of project

This project brings together a transnational network of researchers to discuss the nature and effects of lockdown on gender and sexualities across various sites around the world. Our project explores, questions, and theorizes how the pandemic and lockdown have exacerbated inequalities and vulnerabilities for gender and sexual minority groups specifically around social cohesion.

Our key research objectives are:

1.     Theorizing pandemic citizenship(s) through an analysis of select state discourses and policies of (inter)national organizations. We specifically seek to understand how pandemic citizenship uses differences of class, race, caste, religion, and location to impact forms of social cohesion and enhance structural inequalities between social groups. To this end, we offer a contextual and transnational analysis across different geographical locations around the world (UK, India, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, and Trinidad & Tobago); 

2.     Documenting and conceptualizing the ways in which sexual and gendered minoritised groups and individuals are making life liveable and/or survivable during the pandemic and lockdown; 

3.      Develop interdisciplinary methodologies to centre voices beyond our research networks, including thinking with those minoritised prior to and during the pandemic, and to listen to (and think with) those who are working on the ‘front lines’ of increasing securitized states, receding welfare regimes and deteriorating health care services.

 Project team:

The project is led by Gavin Brown, Professor of Political Geography and Sexualities in the School of Geography, Geology and the Environment (GGE). Other Leicester collaborators are Dr Dave Ashby (GGE), Dr Dylan Kerrigan (Criminology), and Dr Zalfa Feghali (Arts).

The team is also comprised of external partners, with colleagues from Ambedkar University (India), Jindal Global Law School (India), Manchester Metropolitan University (UK), University College Dublin (Ireland), and the University of Edinburgh (UK).