Mining and Quarrying (exclusive to Chile)

CPD, 7-21 days

This is for you if… you want to increase your professional knowledge and are currently working in the mining or quarrying industries in Chile.

Course Description

The following online short courses address some of the critical issues in relation to safe and sustainable mining and quarrying:

  • Tailings Facility Management
  • Blasting
  • Effective Surface Mine Design
  • Mine and Quarry Slope/Face Stability
  • Introduction to Surface Mining Methods

The study material has been drawn from leading experts in the field and will assist those wishing to broaden or deepen their professional knowledge. The courses are delivered in a way which makes them accessible if you want to study part-time and achieve a recognised number of hours of Continuing Professional Development.

The courses have been developed specifically for the Chilean mining and quarrying industries with funding from the UK Government’s Chile Prosperity Fund. They are currently restricted to people working in Chile, and there is no cost for the courses running in October or November. There is a limit of 100 places, and priority will be given to those currently in employment.

All the courses are delivered in English and endorsed by the Geological Society of London and approved as Professional Development by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.

The Geological Society logo   IOM3 PD approved logo

It is expected that the courses will become more widely available for a small fee during 2017.  If you would like to be kept informed of further developments, contact miningCPD@le.ac.uk.

Key Facts
Start date
October 2016, November 2016
Department
Geology
Contact

Course enquiries
miningCPD@le.ac.uk

Department of Geology website

Why Leicester?

Our tutors have over 16 years of experience in developing web-based courses and materials for the minerals industry.

The Department of Geology has a long association with the quarrying industry in the UK and extensive experience in mining geology globally, based on an active Applied and Environmental Geology group.

The University delivers a large number of distance learning courses which has enabled us to develop a high level of expertise and excellence.

Course Structure

Course 1: Tailings Facility Management

Course 1: Tailings Facility Management

Approximately 21 hours of activity over a 3-week period (3-23 October 2016)

Objectives

This course focuses on the subject of tailings facility storage and their good practice management in design, management and operation roles. The study material is largely based on the TailPro Resource, developed by Dr Jon Engels during his time at the University of Leeds. He has kindly made this available, and a learning structure has been built around this resource to help you gain the maximum benefit from the significant amount of material which is covered.

Summary

The course starts with a brief overview of tailings storage and a review of best practice, which is critical to the overarching themes throughout the remainder of the course. The three distinct modules that follow are themed around the main working roles in tailings storage – design, operation and management. Throughout these modules, best practice techniques are considered in the overarching working disciplines of environment, monitoring, emergency and critical response management, and documentation. Weakness identification as well as various potential solutions are evaluated, alongside the presentation of global case studies and practical diagnostic tools.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the course you should be able to:

  • identify the elements that contribute towards tailings storage best practice
  • explain the types of information required throughout a tailings facility life cycle, and how this changes – from design, operation through to decommission
  • describe the different types of data which influence the location and design of tailings facilities
  • ensure that risks are understood and assessed during the design process
  • understand the cause, effect and mitigation techniques for common tailings facility operation issues (through the study of case study examples)
  • actively contribute towards comprehensive monitoring and detailed documentation schemes for tailings management
  • identify and critically assess the management structure required in a tailings facility and understand the interplay, responsibility and cross-over of all roles.

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Course 2: Blasting

Course 2: Blasting

Approximately 8 hours of activity over a 1-week period (24-30 October 2016)

Objectives

This course focuses on the subject of rock blasting which is often required in mines and hard rock quarries to fragment the rock for removal or further processing. It is designed for managers and others who need to understand the drilling and blasting process in order to ensure it is carried out in a controlled and efficient manner, with minimum environmental impacts. It is NOT a shotfirer's course, and the course on its own does not make you competent to design or carry out blasts.

Summary

The course starts with a brief overview of the associated topic of drilling, which is a critical part of the whole blasting process. The various aspects of successful blast design are then considered in relation to quarry blasting to produce a muck-pile, but most of the factors also apply to open-pit and opencast blasting. The course finishes by considering the environmental impacts of blasting, and how they can be avoided or controlled, as many mines are in close proximity to communities who may be concerned about the effects of blasting on their properties.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the course you should be able to:

  • identify the important elements in drilling for blasts
  • explain the different factors involved in blast design
  • know how to check to ensure blasting is being carried out in a controlled manner
  • ensure that blasts are designed to comply with planning limits
  • perform vibration prediction analysis to determine maximum allowable charge weights
  • describe the mitigation measures to control the impacts of blasting.

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Course 3: Effective Surface Mine Design

Course 3: Effective Surface Mine Design

Approximately 16 hours of activity over a 2-week period (31 October - 13 November 2016)

Objectives

This course focuses on the principles and processes involved in the planning and design of successful surface mines and quarries. It is based on a handbook written by Ruth Allington and David Jarvis in the UK, and although the title refers to quarries, most of the themes are relevant to open-pit and opencast mines. An electronic version of the handbook is made available freely to the participants.

Summary

The importance of a planned and systematic approach to mine design is emphasised throughout the course, starting with the information required to select a site and develop an appropriate design. It then goes on to look in detail at the different stages of design and the type of information and investigations required at each stage.  The assessment of risk in the design process is addressed, before going on to consider the vital aspects of stakeholder consultation and communication. 

Learning Objectives

At the end of the course you should be able to:

  • identify the important elements the process of surface mine design
  • explain what information is required before mine design should begin
  • describe the type and source of information and investigations needed to support the design
  • ensure that risks are understood and assessed during the design process
  • list the various stakeholders in relation to the mine and propose appropriate consultation and communication strategies
  • identify the broad range of aspects which need to be carefully managed through the process.

 

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Course 4: Slope and Face Stability

Course 4: Slope and Face Stability

Approximately 8 hours of activity over a 1-week period (14-20 November 2016)

Objectives

This course focuses on the subject of slope and face stability in surface mines and quarries. It is designed for managers and others who need to understand and identify possible slope and face issues and to be able to recognise when specialist professional assistance is required.  It is NOT a specialist geotechnical course which would make the participant competent to design safe slopes or faces.

Summary

The course starts with an overview of the issues involved in surface mine slope and face design, and then describes the mechanisms of failure in hard and soft materials. Some issues relating to small settling ponds are discusses, and mitigation measures to prevent or minimise the impact of slope and face failures are presented.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the course you should be able to:

  • describe the factors influencing stability in excavated and fill slopes
  • identify the different mechanisms of failure in hard and soft materials
  • carry out a simple face/slope appraisal which will highlight areas where action may be required
  • assess the various mitigation measures which might be relevant 
  • identify when further specialist geotechnical assistance may be required
  • discuss the appropriate use of different types of monitoring equipment.

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Course 5: Introduction to Surface Mining Methods

Course 5: Introduction to Surface Mining Methods

Approximately 24 hours of activity over a 3-week period (21 November - 12 December 2016)

Objectives

This course gives a broad introduction to the different types of surface mining, and the techniques and equipment used. It is based on presentations and videos of a UK university undergraduate mining module given by Dr Bill Birch, formerly of the University of Leeds, and now Director of Blast Log Ltd. It is designed for those who want to develop their knowledge across open-pit, opencast (strip mining) and quarrying, and in the selection and optimisation of equipment.

Summary

The course starts with an overview of open-pit mining, opencast mining and quarrying and then gives a detailed explanation of the different types of equipment and how to select and use them most efficiently. These include:

  • Draglines
  • Shovel and truck operations and productivity
  • Motorscrapers
  • Dozers
  • Wheeled loaders
  • Bucket wheeled excavators

The course also includes information on drilling and blasting, and gives examples of restoration/rehabilitation schemes in the UK.

Learning Objectives

 At the end of the course you should be able to:

  • describe the different types of surface mining methods and when they are appropriate to use
  • identify the major pieces of mobile plant and how to use them effectively and efficiently
  • plan a load and haul fleet to achieve a production requirement
  • explain the important parameters in drilling and blasting, and design a simple blast to achieve a specified production safely and efficiently. 

Modules shown represent choices available to current students. The range of modules available and the content of any individual module may change in future years.

Teaching and Assessment

The course is delivered through the University of Leicester’s online Virtual Learning Environment (Blackboard). Therefore you will need a computer and broadband connection with reasonable bandwidth. You will also need Microsoft Excel for some of the activities, and Acrobat Reader may also be needed to read documents which are available to download.

A variety of online teaching methods are used in the different courses. Some are based on video or narrated presentations, while others are primarily based on reading material which is provided on the course. However, all the courses make use of interactive activities such as Self Assessed Questions (SAQs) which are online quizzes that give helpful feedback and enable the participant to assess their knowledge and learning.

Each course also has a number of other practical activities which involve completing tasks which are relevant to the topic. All the course material is available online throughout the course duration, and due to the distance learning element of the course you will be able to work through the material at your own pace over the course schedule.

It is hoped that these courses will be accredited as Continuing Professional Development by a number of different professional bodies (e.g. Geological Society of London, Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, Institute of Quarrying). In order to qualify for a certain number of hours of recognised CPD, the University must be able to demonstrate that the participant has fully engaged with the material.  All courses therefore have two methods of assessment, which are not concerned with measuring the participant’s knowledge or ability, but simply check that the material has been studied!

  • Online test - this will be based on the SAQs which the participant will have completed during the study.
  • Learning Log - this is a journal which the participant will keep during the course, recording any learning and action points, and demonstrating to the tutors that the material has been completed.

Entry Requirements

For the courses starting in October and November 2016, you MUST be working in connection with the Chilean mining and quarrying industries. University students may apply, but priority will be given to those already employed in mining or quarrying.

There are no formal entry requirements. However, as the courses are delivered in English, it is important that you have a good command of the English language. This will be assessed by the course tutors during the application process, which will require the submission of a full CV or resumé, together with a note (up to 100 words) summarising why you would like to undertake the course.

English Language Requirements

You must have a good command of the English language as this course will be taught in English.

Fees and Funding

  • Starting October or November 2016

    • Free (only those working in the Chilean mining and quarrying industries can apply)
  • Starting October or November 2016

    • Free (only those working in the Chilean mining and quarrying industries can apply)

Career Opportunities

Completion of courses such as these not only contributes towards the fulfilment of CPD requirements of a number of professional bodies (e.g. Geological Society of London), but also helps to demonstrate a commitment to demonstrating and maintaining competency. As such, it should increase your opportunities within the industry.

Careers

CPD is an essential element of career development and helps to enhance job prospects. Whether you're an employee looking to get ahead or an employer keen to develop the capabilities of your workforce, studying a CPD course with us will bring the resources of a leading University to your organisation.

Course Qualification Duration Start Dates Availability
Tailings Facility Management CPD 21 hours over 3 weeks 3-23 October 2016

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Blasting CPD 8 hours over 1 week 24-30 October 2016

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Efficient Surface Mine Design CPD 16 hours over 2 weeks 31 October - 13 November 2016

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Slope and Face Stability CPD 8 hours over 1 week 14-20 November 2016

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Introduction to Surface Mining Methods CPD 24 hours over 3 weeks 21 November - 12 December 2016

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Course
Tailings Facility Management
Qualification
CPD
Duration
21 hours over 3 weeks
Start Dates
3-23 October 2016
Availability

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Course
Blasting
Qualification
CPD
Duration
8 hours over 1 week
Start Dates
24-30 October 2016
Availability

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Course
Efficient Surface Mine Design
Qualification
CPD
Duration
16 hours over 2 weeks
Start Dates
31 October - 13 November 2016
Availability

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Course
Slope and Face Stability
Qualification
CPD
Duration
8 hours over 1 week
Start Dates
14-20 November 2016
Availability

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply

Course
Introduction to Surface Mining Methods
Qualification
CPD
Duration
24 hours over 3 weeks
Start Dates
21 November - 12 December 2016
Availability

Please email miningCPD@le.ac.uk to apply